Selkirk’s Coat of Arms Part I

Written by: Emily Karklin Designed in 1982 as part of Selkirk’s centennial celebrations, the coat of arms represents Selkirk’s importance within Manitoba. The Coat of Arms itself has the “City of Selkirk” on a golden banner followed by a blue castle tower. Under that is the shield which is split into four sections by a…

The Selkirk Chimney

Written by: Emily Karklin The Selkirk Chimney is an insulated chimney that was invented by Kelly Sveinson in 1933. The first one they made was using the metal from a Coca-Cola sign. Today all over the world this type of Chimney is still called the Selkirk Chimney. This insulated chimney was revolutionary because it helped…

Newspaper front page

The History of Selkirk Newspapers

Written by: Emily Karklin The 17th century printing press changed the way people received information forever. The first newspaper was printed in german by Johann Carolus and was titled “Account of all Distinguished and Commemorable News.” In the last 150 years the newspaper has become very important in shaping many people’s opinions. Because the newspaper…

Thomas Sinclair Jr.

Thomas Sinclair was the son of Hannah Cummings and Thomas Sinclair Sr. Thomas Sinclair Jr. was a well-liked, Métis man who lived in the Selkirk and Interlake area. He was said to be “a man with no enemy” and was thought of as a polite man who was genuine and helpful to everyone he encountered.…

Dr. David Young

Early Career Dr. David Young was born in Sarnia, Ontario on February 18th, 1847. He graduated with a medical degree from Queens University in 1871. Shortly after completing his degree, his brother, Peter Young, influenced him to move to St. Andrews. One year later, he married Rosina Arabella Somerville from Quebec. They raised five children…

The Landmarks of Selkirk

Written by: Emily Karklin What two things put Selkirk on the map? Catfish and the Rolling Mills. We cannot forget about the Selkirk Water Tower and the Selkirk Lift Bridge are also two very important honourable mentions. Selkirk has a long history and these are some of the important things that put Selkirk on the…

Selkirk Asylum

The Manitoba Asylum

The Asylum’s Beginnings The history of asylums begins at the turn of the 19th century in England, with the United States quickly following suit. Since then, more asylums began to pop up across the United States and in Canada. In Manitoba, the Provincial and Dominion Governments established the first asylum at Lower Fort Garry in…

Anne, Princess Royal

Written by: Emily Karklin Anne, Princess Royal is the second born child to the late Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Phillip, Duke of Edinburgh. She has three brothers, one of which is King Charles III of England. She has two children with her first husband Captain Mark Phillips named Zara and Peter. She is an…

Selkirk and World War 2

Selkirk’s War Effort Written by: Emily Karklin Beginning on September 1st 1939, World War 2 lasted 6 years and one day. With World War 1 being the ‘war to end all wars’ no one was expecting it. Approximately 1,159,000 Canadians (both men and women) enlisted throughout the war effort. Canada did not join the war…

Suffragettes in Selkirk

Written by: Emily Karklin Happy Canadian Women’s History Month! European women in Manitoba won the right to vote on January 28, 1916. This, of course, did not come easily. One woman who not only advocated for women’s rights but also human rights amongst other things was Margret Benedictsson. She was born in Northern Iceland to…