Selkirk has a vast amount of places where people have been able to unwind, explore, and enjoy themselves over the years. Explore what Selkirk has to offer such as parks, historical homes, buildings, and the popular pool. Take a tour, stay for a while.

Selkirk’s First Three Hotels

Selkirk’s Inception The author of Selkirk: The First Hundred Years, Barry Potyondi, described the town’s inception as “Born of the railway and nurtured by the sea.” Both facts wax poetically of two economic influences that led to the development of the town. In 1876, three early speculators, Dr. John Christian Schultz, Samuel L. Bedson and…

Traders bank banner

The Trader’s Bank

A Simple Form Of Currency Before there were institutional banks in communities across Canada, people had to barter or exchange goods and services to acquire what they could not produce for themselves. In Red River settlement the Settlers relied on bartering throughout the West. It was a common method of developing local commerce, but it…

Notre Dame Catholic Church

“Well done, my good and faithful people.” Whether they came on foot, cart, wagon, cutter, buggy, boat, sleigh, bicycle, truck, car, van, or motorcycle, the objective was always the same—to render homage to their Lord and God. The struggles and sacrifices were many but the outcome most rewarding. We’ve Only Just Begun:  History of Notre…

St. Peter’s Reserve

In the Beginning Thousands of First Nations have lived in the Red River Valley for centuries. In the late 1700s, Cree people travelled along Lake Winnipeg to settle near Netley Creek. The Saulteaux, led by Chief Peguis from the Sault St. Marie region in the east settled along the Red River in 1790. This is…

Black and white picture of the Manitoba Rolling Mill Co. LTD.

Manitoba Rolling Mills PT 2: Post War

Shelling out for World War II By 1934 finances began to turn around again and gradually improved until 1939 when World War II began. The Second World War brought new opportunities for the Mill. The Commonwealth Air Training Scheme required multiple Air Training Bases to be built across Canada. These temporary buildings needed reinforcing bars,…

Black and white feature banner photo of the Bradbury

C.G.S. Bradbury

The C.G.S. Bradbury was prefabricated in Sorel, Quebec, and later assembled along the bank of the Selkirk Slough in 1915. The ship was made of steel, it was 48 meters (158ft) long, and had a maximum speed of 15 knots (28km/hr). The Bradbury replaced the S.S. Baldur and operated as a fisheries patrol vessel for…

Gilbart Funeral Home

309 Eveline Street The four-generation business, Gilbart Funeral Home, begins with James Maurice Gilbart. Maurice and his wife, Muriel Dixon were married in their hometown of Elkhorn, Manitoba. When they moved to Winnipeg, Maurice found work at Leatherdale Gardiner Funeral Home. Having found his passion, Maurice wrote and passed his exams to become a funeral…

Feature banner photo of the Selkirk Asylum

Manitoba Asylum

The Asylum’s Beginnings The history of asylums begins at the turn of the 19th century in England, with the United States quickly following suit. Since then, more asylums began to pop up across the United States and in Canada. In Manitoba, the Provincial and Dominion Governments established the first asylum at Lower Fort Garry in 1871…

Photo showing the bridge lifted as a boat is approaching in the distance.

The Selkirk Lift Bridge

The municipalities of Selkirk and St. Clements had long sought out to have a permanent link built across the Red River to replace a busy ferry service, but finding the necessary funds proved elusive. That changed in spring of 1934 when the federal government announced a $40 million national infrastructure program meant to provide employment…