Photo of Knox Presbyterian Church. Made with bricks and high peaking A-Frame roofs.

Knox Presbyterian Church

341 Eveline Street The Presbyterians built a 36’ x 38’ church on this site in 1880 and a manse on the west side of the property in 1896. In 1903 provincial architect, Samuel Hooper drew up plans for a new church building. Construction began in 1904 and the church was in use by the end…

This photo shows off the single level building with a front entrance with two windows on either side

360 Eveline Street

360 Eveline Street The Winnipeg, Selkirk, and Lake Winnipeg Railway Company was formed by a group of local businessmen in 1901 to provide passenger and freight services for residents. By 1906, the line was electrified, and directorship of the company was turned over to the Winnipeg Electric Company. The line ran along Eveline Street until…

Photo shows the two level Scott House on a summer day

Scott House

205 Eaton Avenue This Queen Anne-style house was built in 1898 by Robert Scott, Country Agent and Police Magistrate. A typical side-hall house with a slant roofed kitchen, it boasts a distinctive tower with a pyramidal roof and an enclosed verandah. The Robertson Family owned the house from 1921-1990 when it was sold and became…

Photo showing the post office in the 1930s.

Old Post Office

250 Manitoba Avenue Selkirk’s first post office was opened in 1876 with James Colcleugh as postmaster. Construction of the present building began in 1907 by Brown and Garson Construction Corporation and it was designed by the Winnipeg architectural firm of James Chisholm and Son. For many years it housed the federal government offices in addition…

Photo that captures the front and sides of the Merchant's Hotel. This photo shows the buildings multiple levels.

The Merchant’s Hotel

383 Eveline Street The first Merchant’s Hotel on this property was built in 1887 by John Christian Shultz. The original building was moved back in 1903 to make room for this one. In addition to serving as a hotel, this building has provided space for the Bank of Montreal, a barbershop, and a pool room.…

Picture that captures the front and the sides of the traders bank. The picture allows you to see the buildings three levels along with all the windows along either side of the building.

Trader’s Bank

389 Eveline Street Garson Quarries of Tyndall began work on the foundation of this building in July 1903. J. M. Beattie was in charge of the construction of the building. The first floor was shared by the bank and Moody’s hardware, the second provided space for many of the city’s professional offices, while the third…

Picture of the front of Stuart House. You can see the porch with surrounded by a railing, the second story window and the trees on the side of the house on a summer day.

Stuart House

478 Eveline Street James Stuart, manager of the Selkirk Electric Light Company, built this house in 1904. The Selkirk Electric Light Company was formed in 1890 and was the first producer of electricity in town.The 2 1⁄2 storey house is of brick masonry with a poured concrete foundation. It is distinguished by decorative brick belts,…

Path that one can walk on through Little Lake park.

Little Lake

East End of Dorchester Avenue Little Lake Park was officially opened in 1991, but its roots date back to a much earlier greenspace called Daerwood Park. Located near the southern boundary of the former St. Peter’s Reserve, this land was going to be the site of a summer cottage subdivision, planned in the early 1900s…

Playground at Murray-Sinclair park.

Murray Sinclair Park

301 Queen Avenue Murray Sinclair Park was one of a pair of playgrounds built by the Kinsmen Club of Selkirk in the mid-1950s. It was part of a national Kinsmen program to provide improved play opportunities for the new wave of children born immediately after the war. Kinsmen South Playground on Main Street at Dorchester…

The Selkirk Park banner showing people on the shoreline of Selkirk Park watching boats pass by on the water

Selkirk Park

486 Eveline StOn the morning of July 1, 1905, 1,200 members of the International Order of Oddfellows left Winnipeg for Selkirk aboard steam trains operated by the Winnipeg Selkirk and Lake Winnipeg Railway (WS & LW). They were greeted by Selkirk’s Oddfellows before walking a couple of kilometres to what was formerly Red River Park…