A New Industrial Era 1911-1928

1911

An ammonia refrigerator plant was built.  This plant was said to be the largest in Canada.  It had cold storage rooms to accommodate two million pounds of fish.

1911

The town convinced the Dominion government to provide street mailboxes.

1911

The Town installed an electric power distribution system with power supplied by the Winnipeg Electric Street Railway Company.

1912

Water and sewage service was now offered. A 25-horse powered gas engine was added for additional water pressure provided by the 225 foot tall water tower.

1912

The Town Council acquired a gravel pit for better road maintenance, and passed the town’s first building code to regulate the sort of construction that could take place.

1912

This is a black and white photo taken in the winter of 1910 overlooking West Selkirk Manitoba Circa. There are buildings down the street, and group of houses in the background.

Professor A. A. Stoughton of the University of Manitoba Architecture Department was asked for advice on the development of a comprehensive town planning scheme. One recommendation was to relocate the railway tracks from Eveline to Main Street “which would be divided by a grand boulevard in the manner of Winnipeg’s Broadway Avenue”.

1912

The Selkirk Development Company Ltd offered 30 acres free to the steel rolling mill company (which had recently been destroyed by fire) in St. Boniface to locate there.  Council approved a 40% reduction in property taxes for the mill for 12 years, if at least 15 locals were employed by the rolling mill.

1912

Charles Cornwash opened the town’s first automobile repair shop.

1912

Manitoba expanded its borders to the 60th north parallel.

1914

 

This is a black and white of the Manitoba Rolling Mills in 1920. It is a group of three long buildings and a white shed in a field.

Manitoba Rolling Mills Company and its subsidiary Manitoba Nut and Bolt works, were completed.

1914

This is a photo of the Canadian Red Ensign. It is a red flag with the British flag in the top left corner, and the shield of the coat of arms of Canada towards the bottom right.

Great Britain declared war on Germany resulting in Canada entering the First World War.

1915

This is a black and white photo taken in 1916 of the 108th Battalion at the Red Feather Farm. There are multiple rows of men standing at attention in long black button up coats with hats.

Lieutenant-Colonel G. H. Bradbury created the 108th infantry battalion for service in the First World War.

1916

On January 28 women gained the right to vote in Manitoba.

1916

A prohibition referendum was passed 424-153, making Selkirk a “dry” town.

1916

Manitoba Steel Foundries Ltd was built with the first electric smelting furnace in western Canada (it specialized in providing railway castings).

1917

This is a photo of a white felt patch in the shape of a fish sewn onto a red piece of fabric. The detailing is sewn onto the fish with red string.

The Manitoba Junior Hockey League was founded. The Selkirk Fishermen was one of the original members.

1917

C.E. McKay was appointed to operate a new ferry.

1917

The Selkirk Returned Veterans Association was formed.

1917

This is a black and white photo of the Keenora ship. There are lots of passengers on the top deck of the boat while the boat is sailing down the river.

The “S.S. Keenora” was dismantled and taken by rail to Winnipeg where it was rebuilt with an additional 30 feet added.

1917

The Greek Ukrainian Catholic Church was constructed.

1918

This is a photo showing a clipping from the Winnipeg Evening Tribune saying "Spanish 'flu' may catch you if you don't watch out!".

The Spanish Influenza Epidemic began.  Both doctors in Selkirk came down with the flu, and for nearly two months Selkirk was a quarantined town.

1918

First Pentecostal worship in Selkirk. 

1919

This is a black and white photo taken in 1919 of the Peace Parade. There are people marching down the streets holding banners.

After the signing of the Treaty of Versailles in July, a peace parade was held, with a large evening dance in the park and fireworks.

1919

The Winnipeg General Strike began.

1919

The Selkirk Lutheran Church burned to the ground from a lightening strike.

1920

This is a black and white photo of Devonshire School in 1919. it is a tall two story building with windows along each floor. in front of it is an empty field, and there are buildings to its left.

Devonshire Collegiate Institute officially opened.

1920

The Manitoba Bridge and Engineering Company of Winnipeg bought the Manitoba Rolling Mills as a wholly-owned subsidiary.

1920

2,000 tons of bar iron was being produced each month from scrap iron and steel for global markets (including 400 tons sold to Japan).

1920

Lisgar Lodge #2 was built housing the Masons chapter formed in 1870 in Selkirk.

1921

This is a black and white photo from 1927 of the telephone operators at the Selkirk Exchange Circa. There a three women sitting together at desks with headsets on.

A new telephone exchange building opened on Manitoba Avenue.

1923

P. J. Smith, the President of the Rolling Mills was elected Mayor.

1924

The present Selkirk building of the Selkirk Evangelical Lutheran Church was constructed.

1925

The Rolling Mills 40% property tax exemption expired, helping to alleviate the towns tax revenue issue.

1925

The Methodist Church united with Congregational and Presbyterian churches, creating the Selkirk United Church.

1926

This is a photo of the Royal Canadian Legion Badge. It has a Gold circle with the words Memorial, Eorum, and Retinebimus written across it it. There is a Red and grey crown placed on top, with a blue ribbon with the word "Legion" written across the front, and three red poppies underneath.

The Royal Canadian Legion opened a Selkirk branch.

August 19, 1926

The Veteran Memorial Gardens space was declared a suitable location to pay respects to those who gave their all for freedom.

1926

Manitoba Steel Foundries Ltd burned down and was rebuilt.

1927

The Selkirk & District War Memorial Association was formed.

November 11, 1927

The Official unveiling of the monument at the Veteran Memorial Gardens by Theodore Arthur Burrows, Manitoba’s Lieutenant Governor.