The photo shows the front of Colcleugh House located at 102 Pacific Avenue. The picture sows the front of the house, a two story building wiith two windows on the top floor and one on the bottom beside the front door.

Colcleugh House

102 Pacific Ave Built between 1872 and 1874 for Frederick W. Colcleugh who would become Selkirk’s second mayor (he was also cousin to James Colcleugh who was the first mayor of Selkirk). Frederick W. Colcleugh lived here with his wife Emma Shaw Colcleugh. Emma Colcleugh was born on September 3, 1846, in Thompson, Connecticut. She…

Photo of the front of Comber House, better known to the locals of Selkirk as Gilbart's Funeral Home found at 309 Eveline. A Larger building with multiple levels and a attached chapel.

Comber House

309 Eveline Street This grand old Queen Anne-style house was built prior to 1890 for Edwin F. Comber, Chief Engineer at the Asylum, financial agent, librarian, electrician, inventor, and prominent citizen of Selkirk. It is constructed of brick on a wooden frame with a truncated pyramidal roof. Note the variety of windows: bay, Palladian, and…

Photo shows the front of Smith House located at 322 Eveline Street. A large white home that sits on the side of the Red River. A large white two story home with many windows in every room allows lots of natural light into the house.

Smith House

322 Eveline Street This house dates back to at least 1890 and is believed that Captain Roderick Smith was the first owner. Smith served as the first mate of the steamer “Northcote” during the Riel Rebellion and was part owner of a grocery store, but was a boat builder by trade. He built many York…

Photo shows the frontal view of West House found at 323 Eveline Street on a summer day.

West House

323 Eveline Street This Queen Anne-style house was built in 1888 for Captain Charles H. West by Robert Moncrieff and Frank Wright. This is a 1 1⁄2 storey structure with horizontal wood siding on a wood frame and sits on a stone foundation. A bay window protrudes into the open verandah, which is supported by…

Photo shows a frontal view of 202 Vaughn Avenue. A smaller style home.

202 Vaughan Avenue

202 Vaughan Avenue Many of the homes on Vaughn appear on the first assessment rolls in 1890, indicating that they are perhaps even older than that. Several of these homes were built from a side-hall plan. You will see an especially fine example at 202 and others at 205 and 227. An early duplex can…

The photo shows a shot of Teeter house found at 218 McLean Avenue. Teeter House was built in the popular bungalow style of its time.

Teeter House

218 McLean Avenue This home was built in 1916 for Rev. Chancellor Teeter, pastor of Wesley Methodist Church. It was designed by his nephew and architect, George Teeter, and has remained in his family to the present. Built in the bungalow style, which was then popular, with wood shingles over horizontal siding, this house included…

Photo shows the front of Gibbs House with trees in front of the house.

Gibbs House

212 McLean Avenue This house was built in 1921 by Roy Hooker for pharmacist Fred Gibbs. Though its enlaced veranda is characteristic of the Queen Anne style, it is more similar to a Cottage style with its wood frame construction and horizontal wood siding and cedar shingles on the walls. This was also a popular…

Photo shows the large Selkirk United Church. Photo captures the large entrance way wit ha overhang supported by two large pillars

Selkirk United Church

202 McLean Avenue The Methodists erected a building on this site in 1895. When the Methodists united with the Congregational and Presbyterian churches in 1925, it was raised on a basement and served until the present sanctuary was built in 1958. An extension was added in 2011 and the old building now serves as a…

Photo of Knox Presbyterian Church. Made with bricks and high peaking A-Frame roofs.

Knox Presbyterian Church

341 Eveline Street The Presbyterians built a 36’ x 38’ church on this site in 1880 and a manse on the west side of the property in 1896. In 1903 provincial architect, Samuel Hooper drew up plans for a new church building. Construction began in 1904 and the church was in use by the end…